Demo Report April 15th 2021 – Sue Harker

Sue started the demo by welcoming the members and explaining the project she would be demonstrating, an open segmented vase.

Sue started with the base and was faced off so that the segments can be positioned correctly.

Sue produced a segment jig which makes it easier to position and measure between the spokes at the outer edge of the project, 

Sue stated that we needed to use side grain and not end grain for these segments, (35mm x 7mm) the angle being 150, whilst cutting you will need to flip the wood over whilst cutting the required amount of segment, 

These were then sanded and glued into position.

The glue used was Titebond Quick and Thick.

Sue explained how to position each segmented section and how to glue each one for the build-up and cut down on the glue where the openings will be.  A pipe cleaner and water being used to wipe the excess glue out of the holes.  A thick piece of paper was used between the top and bottom, prior to the complete glue-up process being undertaken.

At this point, it is time to shape the vase to your requirements.

We now need to separate the two sections where the paper is holding the two parts together, these should be able to break apart where the paper is holding the two pieces together.  

At this point, we can hollow out the base to a depth as per the requirement.  You will need to be careful of the wall thickness at this point you will need a wall thickness of about 5 to 6mm.

Sue then hollowed out the top section being careful with the segments as there are gaps between the wood shapes.

Sue then put the two parts back together by using CA glue ( CA for the demo quickness, Titebond is usually used) and only apply on the segmented ends, pressure can be put on the two parts by the lathe as the CA glue dries.  When dry the final shape and sanding can take place to the required standard.  

The entrance to the vase now needs to be cut, as the top was drilled out we know that there is a reference point within the vase that will be close to the top opening.  By taking it carefully we can meet up with the drilled hole and shape the inlet part of the vase.

The complete vase can now be parted off from the waste wood.  We now need to consider the process of removing the parting tool marks, therefore we will need to produce a type of jam chuck that the vase can be mounted on and held in place by the tailstock drive center.  This jam chuck is not a tight fit as you will need to use a gripped mat to help with the holding.  The base can now be turned off. The nub will now need to be removed and sanded.

A finishing oil of hard wax oil is used to cover the vase but you need to remember to also fill the gaps between the segments for full coverage.

As the evening progressed, I think that we all should have been able to take something from the demonstration as Sue explained everything as she went along.

On behalf of the club, We would like to thank Sue Harker for this months demonstration. Report by Barrie Fisher and edited by Steve Hackett

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