Youtube Demos

Let me start by saying that I hope you are all well and safe at this particular time, and that we will be able to start the club nights up in the near future with a lot of luck.

I have seen a couple of these demos and have noticed some club members names come up so I thought that if you all have the information of when they are on might be of interest to you all.

Please note the following dates that Martin Sabin-Smith will be carrying out live demonstrations on Youtube for the rest of April and all of May. All demos will be available for 7 days after the stream.

Martins Youtube Channel – Link

Tue April 7th 7pm ProEdge Sharpening

Sat April 10th 10am Elegant Beginners Bowl

Wed April 15th 7pm Intrinsic Pastels

Wed April 22nd 10.30am Fly on the wall

Sat April 25th 10am Day demo

Tue April 28th 7pm Live demo

Thur April 30th 7pm Live demo

Wed May 6th 7pm Live demo

Sat May 9th 10am Live demo

Wed May 13th 7pm Live demo

Tue May 19th 7pm Live demo

Sat May 23rd 10am Live demo

Wed May 27th 7pm Live demo

More Info – Link

At the time of putting this together The Tiny Turner Emma Cook was trying to set up a similar demonstration set up but at present is having trouble with Youtube and live streaming services, so watch this spot if I hear of anything more.

Tiny Turners Youtube – Link

Regards

Barrie Fisher

Axminster – Martin Sabin-Smith Demo

1st Feb 2020

Took a visit out to see Martin Sabin-Smith carrying out a full day demonstration where he undertook three projects. I must say sorry but I did forget to take my camera with me but thanks to club members this has been overcome. There were seven club members present, but thanks go to Steve for pictures.

The first was a goblet made from two woods (Bubinga and Ash), the head of the goblet was produced first by hollowing out the main body and then shaping the external part, this was then sanded down using the following grits 120, 180, 240 and 400, these are the ones that Martin uses and he stated that he does not go higher than 400. He started with his own sanding sealer, then used the Hampshire Sheen Bronze product to enhance the grain on the bubinga, after which he used Microcrystaline wax to give the project it’s shine. The second part was making the base out of ash, where the pattern kept changing from it’s original concept. Again the finishing was exactly the same as for the top and then glued together to form the complete goblet.

The second project was small Olive bowl, where as he was turning the outside he came across some checking which showed up more after sanding this was then covered with thin CA glue to give the wood it’s strength back again. A small bead was put around the top of the bowl at a distance that the bead was wide. The project was then edged with Frog tape ready for colour to be applied to the beading only, this was an earth dye which was air-sprayed on. At this stage the sanding sealer was applied, Martin stated that he uses as much as the project will take. This was then finished off using the Hampshire Sheen High Gloss Wax. Martin then started on the inner part of the bowl but came upon a problem where a internal crack just kept getting larger, therefore this project was abandoned for reasons of safety.

The third project was adding colour to a large bowl which was pre-shaped for the outside. He started by making sure that the bowl had been sanded to the required level prior to adding the dye. This dye was added in two parts for the base colour where both Black and Ruby was added to cover the outer shape. This was then sanded back to remove an amount of the dye which would be ready for the final dying. The sanding was started in reverse with 400 grit and then using lower grits if required. The additional colours were then added using Ruby, Red and Orange. This was then sanded back in certain areas to identify differing aspects of the wood. At this stage a Honey colour was added over these areas to give it’s overall effect. When dry Martin applied the sanding sealer to the required level prior to adding the High Gloss Wax. It was at this stage where he showed another way of finishing the project. First apply the wax over the complete dyed area, this was then melted with a hot air gun without causing the wax to bubble, if this happens the process will need to be started again.

At the second stage of adding the wax and heat to melt the project was buffed up by a paper pad to give it’s shine. This process was again repeated a further three times to give a very deep shine. Martin stated that this was a more advanced way of applying a finish and getting a better result but needed additional care carrying out the process. The hot air gun that Martin used was where he could get a value of 650 degrees from it. Martin then started on the inner area and showed the technique that he applies when removing the waste wood.

The show itself was well worth the day out and gave a better insight to completing projects by spending more time on the finishing aspect of wood turning

Wolfgang – Fruit Turning

Thursday 20th February 2020

It’s that time again where we welcome a club member or members to carry out the turning demonstration for tonight’s event. The member is Wolfgang, he is producing a project of Apples, Pears, Lemon and a small box all made out of Yew.

Wolfgang used a type of screw chuck that the members were able to produce back in Jan, instead of it being made out of pine this was a stronger and more stable wood Laburnum.

The Yew blanks had already been turned round ready for the demonstration, these were in two lengths for the fruits.

The Apple was turned first which can be turned to a apple shape that does not need to be perfect for every one produced as we do not get exact shapes in nature.

Wolfgang gave a commentary whilst turning and answered question that members had whilst the turning was taking place.

The Pear was next which was started basically the same as the apple but was finished with a differing shape to produce elongated section of the pear.

Both the apple and the pear were finished off by applying microcrystalline wax and then polished with a polishing mop which was dedicated to this wax, prior to inserting a clove into the base of each. The stalk was made from a small twig that Wolfgang had growing at home.

The next area of fruit was the Lemon which was turned without the use of the screw chuck but needed a spigot to work from to produce the shape required which is more symmetrical than the other fruits. All of this took place before the half time break. After the break A Yew box was started by using spigots and jam chucks to get the overall shape required.

It’s good that we have a large amount of expertise within the club and members are able to step in and deliver their knowledge for various projects.

Thanks must also go out to Rob who set up the camera and video set up which made the demonstrations clearer for those seated watching.

The members also bought into the clubhouse a selection of their own handcrafted items for other members to look at during the evening, and give them additional ideas for themselves.