March Zoom Demo

This month’s demonstration was hosted by Rob and Steve Hackett in a role reversal from last month. With Rob being the turner and Steve the cameraman.

The evening’s demonstration is a Basket Weave Illusion on Hollow Forms and Boxes.

Sycamore is the chosen wood for the evening, and Rob emphasized the health and safety aspects of using the lathe prior to starting. The blank was turned around and a 50mm Tenon produced on the end.

Rob introduced his shop-made beading tools, one made from an old bowl gouge, and one from an old carving gouge.

And another made from a bolt.

Rob shaped the blank ready for the beading process.

At this point, Rob used his beading tool made from a bolt,  to apply three beads at a point where the blank was to be parted. 

The central one was then removed for the parting to take place, at which point a depth of 5 to 6mm on the rim was cut for when the blank would become one piece again, 

After parting the blank both ends were then hollowed out to the required depth, the shape of the lid part was taken down prior to parting with a small 18 or 19mm tenon for holding.

At this point, Rob introduced a Collet Chuck which can be found on Amazon’s website. 2MT ER32 Collet Chuck or 2MT ER25 Collet Chuck

After both parts had been hollowed out they were then glued back together with some CA glue in this instance for quickness, epoxy would be better. Being careful not to run the glue to the edge of the item as it could cause fumes when banding the item when dry, the beading then starts to take shape along the length of the hollow form.

At this point, Rob explained how he made a beading tool out of a normal bolt which worked very well, a slower speed was required for the beading of the hollow form with the tool being moved from side to side but it must be remembered not to go all the way to the bottom of the tool as tear-out could happen and spoil the artistic flair of the item.

At each point where the beads meet a wire was inserted with the lathe running to get a burnt line around the item, where the wire could not be used a small piece of Formica was used.

Drill out the top of the hollow form at this point with a 12mm drill to form the opening.

At this point, the complete project is sanded down ready for the decoration to be applied.

As Rob stated the basketweave required could be applied either by eye or by measurement depending on what you require the outcome to be, the upright lines are now burnt into the form being very careful not to touch the beads, work from both sides to aid in this aspect. 

When you are satisfied with the pattern you can start to think about the colors that will be applied and in what shape. The paint used was acrylic with a high pigment content, this will mean that you only need to color twice to get the depth of color that you would require.

All questions were answered throughout the session with good positive answers by Rob with additional information added also.

On behalf of the club, I would like to thank Rob and Steve for this month’s demonstration and for the bumping car announcement partway through. 

Report by Barrie Fisher and edited by Steve Hackett

January Zoom Demo

Our thanks go out to both Steve Hackett and Robert Hackett who were able to come together and put on the turning demo for those of us who are in lockdown and unable to move around.

Robert Hackett – Gesso Texturing Technique

Robert started by applying black gesso on to a pre-turned bowl shape, whilst this was still wet sawdust was added which adhered to the surface of the wet gesso.  

A second layer of gesso was then added all over to remove the color of the sawdust showing.  This technique when applied does not need to be perfectly smooth as it is covered and will allow for a better key for the gesso.

When this piece had dried a mixture of Hampshire Sheen Embellishing Waxes was applied by dabbing this onto the top of the gesso and then rubbed into the bowl surface by way of a cheap toothbrush. Robert was also explaining the process as he progressed through the complete process.

Steve Hackett – Twisted Three-sided Weed Pot – (Multi-Axis Turning)

Steve started with a blank that needed to be turned round.  When this had been accomplished the marking up process was detailed onto the blank.

This marking up process was shown both live and through the use of a slide show.

Steve started by dividing the blank into three equal parts by means of the indexing set up included in the lathe headstock.  Two pencil rings were added to each end of the blank, the first one 10mm in and then the second one, in a further 5mm.  The equal lines were then extended down each end so that we have three areas marked on the inner ring.  These were then numbered 1, 2, and 3 on each end so that they matched up, these are 1200 apart.

To get the twist the following number combinations were used;

1 – 2, 2 – 3, 3 – 1    these give a twisted shape

If you only require a three-sided item, match up the following numbers;

1 – 1, 2 – 2, 3 – 3

Additional multisided items can be developed by using the same method.

The blank was mounted between centers with a two-prong drive in the headstock and a pointed live centre in the tailstock.

At this point Steve started the process of turning the twist, this was done by looking at the ghost image at the top of the turning blank, following the curve to get an equal displacement along each side.  

Steve stated that the turning should be cut from the centre out towards the ends, this prevents an aggressive cut from being applied to the ends.  The speed of the lathe went up as high as was safe to do so due to cutting a lot of free air. If you only cut straight across, you will end up with a project that bulges in the middle.

This was then sanded and sealed, a tenon was cut onto the one end and remounted into a scroll chuck.

A hole was then drilled down the weed pot by using a starting point with the aid of an engineering centre drill.  The top of the jar was then trimmed by scalloping the top into the bored hole.

At this point, a jam chuck was mounted and the weed pot was inverted and mounted on the jam chuck, the base was then scalloped out and finished, this process allowed it to stand correctly on a surface.

The weed pot was finished by buffing with a series 3 of buffing wheels on the lathe, Steve explained and demonstrated how to use this system.

The buffing wheels used are available from  The Polishing Shop. 

https://www.thepolishingshop.co.uk/polishing-kits/horn-wood-polishing-kits/menzerna-horn-and-wood-kit-for-a-bench-grinder-750160

Steve commented on the process as he worked through it, during the demo, a Blue Peter moment was required when the blank voluntarily removed itself from the lathe.

With the way that the lockdown is developing at present, the next demo will also be put on by Steve and Robert Hackett.

Last but not least we must also thank Robert for operating all of the equipment that allows these demos to take place.

Report by Barrie Fisher & Steve Hackett

Zoom Demonstration 1 by BCWT Club Members – August 20th 2020

PPE requirements

Gloves – Mask – Glasses or goggles – enclosed shoes

Also have a fire extinguisher on hand just in case you did not clean the area sufficiently first.

Tools

Scraping chisel – Parting tool – could also use carbide tools – patterning tools.

The Demo

This is the first demonstration carried out by a club member whilst on zoom, this is a bit nerve racking as there is no audience in front of you whilst you are explaining what is happening throughout the process and also a different type of how to ask questions, therefore this will be a steep learning curve for all of us in the use of the cameras and sound and recording of the process.

The Black Country Wood Turners club will be having one of their own Roger Cheshire to demonstrate how to use pewter within a wood turned project for this evening. The pewter can be turned into cabochons, finials and rings, all of which can be decorated.

Roger started by explaining how to obtain pewter from various sources and demonstrated how to cut the pewter down and melt. The melting pot was a standard milk pan to contain the pewter and then a camping gas single hob canister heater which is more that sufficient to melt the pewter, Roger has found over the years to melt the pewter and let is cool for a while and then reheat to melted prior to pouring. There is also the possibility of getting slag on top of the pewter which can be remover with a fork or spoon, at this point don’t tell the wife you have just used the best pan and utensils for this work. You will also need a level surface before you pour the pewter to get it level within the former.

Whilst waiting for the pewter to melt Roger mounted some wood on to the lathe to form a former for the pewter to be poured into, a steady hand is required whilst pouring, you need to take it steady but not too slowly for when the two ends of the molten pewter in the former a tenon was also turned into the former so that the solid pewter could be inserted into a chuck with gripper jaws ready for shaping. This was then turned to the required size ready to be inserted into the turned wooden item.

Prior to pouring the melted pewter the former itself was warmed up to remove any moisture that might be present as this could cause the pewter to bubble and splash out of the former. Roger also warned against using an oily wood as this would also react against the melted pewter.

During the session, there were various aspects of turning the pewter and inlaying a pattern which was explained along with the type of tools used for shaping the project.

The turned pewter is then polished down to 2000 grit with some wet and dry and then with the addition of T-cut to finish the polishing process. It was also stated that the use of Yorkshire Grit could be used the White container type.

Our thanks go to Roger for being the first turner to be captured digitally by the new set up.

I for one thought that the event went very well for a first-time event and was also a steep learning curve for both Rob and Ian to get to grips with the audio and video side of things, there is room for improvement to give a better viewing aspect and enjoyment experience. It is hoped that we will have learned a little more about the computer system for the future demonstrations and be able to record them and use them on the club website for everyone to see again. At the same time, now we have the full complement of the zoom facilities we are still getting to grips with the added aspect of what can be used.

Hopefully for next month we will have enticed another club member who is willing to undergo the inspection of the lens and get used to talking through a mike and camera.

We will also be maintaining our chin wag sessions on a regular basis, so we can still discuss things as to what may be accomplished with the zoom demonstrations.

Additional Information for Pewter.

Pewter can be beautifully crafted, and is relatively easy to work with

Warning

Melt pewter in a well-ventilated area with access to incoming fresh air. Some pewter contains a high concentration of lead, which when melted can be toxic to inhale.
Never allow water to splash into your melting pewter.

A splash of water can cause a burst of steam to fly up onto your face or hands, potentially causing serious injury.

Step 1

Place your pewter pieces into a stove-safe pot or pan.

Step 2

Turn the heat onto your stove up to its highest setting. Temperatures allowed by stoves vary depending on make and source of heat; your goal is to reach pewter’s melting point, Depending on the exact mix of metals, pewter has a melting point of 225 to 240 C (437 to 464 degrees F).

Step 3

Allow the metal to melt slowly. Remember that unlike ice, pewter does not melt gradually. The pewter will not begin to liquefy until the full piece has reached its melting point. Be patient during the melting process. Melting times will vary depending on how much pewter you melt and the temperature of your stove.

Step 4

Gently stir the melting pewter with a wooden utensil. This will help the heat to distribute more evenly.

The cuttlefish bone can also be used to form a mould.

Tip

Pewter can also easily be melted over a fire, or by using a blow torch.

Axminster – Martin Sabin-Smith Demo

1st Feb 2020

Took a visit out to see Martin Sabin-Smith carrying out a full day demonstration where he undertook three projects. I must say sorry but I did forget to take my camera with me but thanks to club members this has been overcome. There were seven club members present, but thanks go to Steve for pictures.

The first was a goblet made from two woods (Bubinga and Ash), the head of the goblet was produced first by hollowing out the main body and then shaping the external part, this was then sanded down using the following grits 120, 180, 240 and 400, these are the ones that Martin uses and he stated that he does not go higher than 400. He started with his own sanding sealer, then used the Hampshire Sheen Bronze product to enhance the grain on the bubinga, after which he used Microcrystaline wax to give the project it’s shine. The second part was making the base out of ash, where the pattern kept changing from it’s original concept. Again the finishing was exactly the same as for the top and then glued together to form the complete goblet.

The second project was small Olive bowl, where as he was turning the outside he came across some checking which showed up more after sanding this was then covered with thin CA glue to give the wood it’s strength back again. A small bead was put around the top of the bowl at a distance that the bead was wide. The project was then edged with Frog tape ready for colour to be applied to the beading only, this was an earth dye which was air-sprayed on. At this stage the sanding sealer was applied, Martin stated that he uses as much as the project will take. This was then finished off using the Hampshire Sheen High Gloss Wax. Martin then started on the inner part of the bowl but came upon a problem where a internal crack just kept getting larger, therefore this project was abandoned for reasons of safety.

The third project was adding colour to a large bowl which was pre-shaped for the outside. He started by making sure that the bowl had been sanded to the required level prior to adding the dye. This dye was added in two parts for the base colour where both Black and Ruby was added to cover the outer shape. This was then sanded back to remove an amount of the dye which would be ready for the final dying. The sanding was started in reverse with 400 grit and then using lower grits if required. The additional colours were then added using Ruby, Red and Orange. This was then sanded back in certain areas to identify differing aspects of the wood. At this stage a Honey colour was added over these areas to give it’s overall effect. When dry Martin applied the sanding sealer to the required level prior to adding the High Gloss Wax. It was at this stage where he showed another way of finishing the project. First apply the wax over the complete dyed area, this was then melted with a hot air gun without causing the wax to bubble, if this happens the process will need to be started again.

At the second stage of adding the wax and heat to melt the project was buffed up by a paper pad to give it’s shine. This process was again repeated a further three times to give a very deep shine. Martin stated that this was a more advanced way of applying a finish and getting a better result but needed additional care carrying out the process. The hot air gun that Martin used was where he could get a value of 650 degrees from it. Martin then started on the inner area and showed the technique that he applies when removing the waste wood.

The show itself was well worth the day out and gave a better insight to completing projects by spending more time on the finishing aspect of wood turning

Wolfgang – Fruit Turning

Thursday 20th February 2020

It’s that time again where we welcome a club member or members to carry out the turning demonstration for tonight’s event. The member is Wolfgang, he is producing a project of Apples, Pears, Lemon and a small box all made out of Yew.

Wolfgang used a type of screw chuck that the members were able to produce back in Jan, instead of it being made out of pine this was a stronger and more stable wood Laburnum.

The Yew blanks had already been turned round ready for the demonstration, these were in two lengths for the fruits.

The Apple was turned first which can be turned to a apple shape that does not need to be perfect for every one produced as we do not get exact shapes in nature.

Wolfgang gave a commentary whilst turning and answered question that members had whilst the turning was taking place.

The Pear was next which was started basically the same as the apple but was finished with a differing shape to produce elongated section of the pear.

Both the apple and the pear were finished off by applying microcrystalline wax and then polished with a polishing mop which was dedicated to this wax, prior to inserting a clove into the base of each. The stalk was made from a small twig that Wolfgang had growing at home.

The next area of fruit was the Lemon which was turned without the use of the screw chuck but needed a spigot to work from to produce the shape required which is more symmetrical than the other fruits. All of this took place before the half time break. After the break A Yew box was started by using spigots and jam chucks to get the overall shape required.

It’s good that we have a large amount of expertise within the club and members are able to step in and deliver their knowledge for various projects.

Thanks must also go out to Rob who set up the camera and video set up which made the demonstrations clearer for those seated watching.

The members also bought into the clubhouse a selection of their own handcrafted items for other members to look at during the evening, and give them additional ideas for themselves.